How Full Is Your Glass?

I love podcasts! In fact, I started recording podcasts because of how much I loved listening to them. Recently, I was listening to a podcast about car salesmen, and one man in particular said something that really stood out to me and made me think, “What if I applied this to my work and life?”

The man in question was a Jeep salesman. At the time, he was number one at his dealership and number 108 for his company in the nation. That might not sound like much, but when you consider that he was one out of 29,000 salesmen, being number 108 is pretty impressive. When other guys were selling 10 or 15 Jeeps a month, he was selling 30. At one point during the podcast, the old adage of “Is your glass half full, or half empty” came up. I’m sure most people would have expected him to reply as most stereotypical optimists would, “The glass is half full.” However, his response instead was, “My glass isn’t half full or half empty. It’s always all the way full.”

What a remarkable response! Some of you may think it’s silly, but I really want you to consider what would happen if we viewed our lives this way. What would change? Sure, we all have bad days. We all have our ups and downs. But our perspective on life will help alter our response to the hills and valleys that we all face. So is the glass half full, half empty, or all the way full? That’s up to you to decide.

For more information on this subject, please download and listen to The Appraiser Coach Podcast Episode:

6 Comments on “How Full Is Your Glass?”

  1. Pingback: How Full Is Your Glass? - Appraisal Buzz

  2. Great reminder. We work with a lot of appraisers and we love to see when they take some time to enjoy their personal life, whether it’s family or hobbies. The enthusiasm and joy you instantly hear when they start talking about their plans and afterwards when we ask how things went. It’s great. Appraisers often spend a lot of time solo, driving, inspecting, working on reports. Appraisers often work long hours. A break is needed to appreciate things and recover, even if it’s just an afternoon off.

  3. Great post!

    I love my job and it’s a blessing to do it. I will never forget my terrible, soul sucking experience working in a gray cube in an insurance gig after college.

  4. what do you do when you’re obviously the smartest person at the company, nobody ever truly listens to your input, and happen to be the bosses son but still cant get a single day off to even begin to rationalize the enjoyment of a semblance of a “normal life”?

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