Procedure Manuals: Tips For Success

Let’s talk about your procedure manual. What procedure manual, you ask? Well, the one you should have (if you don’t). Even if you’re the only person working in your office, you should have a procedure manual. Why go to all the trouble to write out a procedure manual? For one, writing things out will help you find places you can improve. Another reason to put one together is to help you prepare for the possibility of hiring help in the future. Even if you don’t ever plan to hire someone else, having a procedure manual will benefit you and your business. Today I want to share some tips to help you create a successful procedure manual.

           I have found great success having my manual online. Because I have a virtual office, this makes it easy for everyone I work with to access it. Make sure it’s secured so that not anyone can get in. I also like to have my manual be editable. Even my tier 1 employees can make changes to my manual, allowing for better ideas and giving another set of eyes to catch mistakes. I like to break my manual down into positions, job descriptions, and tasks for each assignment. Where possible, I attach a short video to demonstrate the process, include a short description of that process, and a checklist to guide my employees through the task.

           This may sound complicated, but taking the time to put together a well-thought-out process manual is key to running a business smoothly. Even if you don’t think you have a process for something, chances are you do. Take a moment to stop and think about how you perform a given task, and write it down. Doing so will help you refine your process, and will allow for others to perform tasks in your business with efficiency and confidence.

For more information on this subject, please download and listen to The Appraiser Coach Podcast Episode: 

7 Comments on “Procedure Manuals: Tips For Success”

  1. Considering is seems you like to hire from developing counties instead of the good old USA, my question is, how many different languages does it come in?

    Secondly, to the appraiser Dave’s of the world who have not been able to flourish over the past two years under a very friendly market, do not make a procedure manual until your work on yourself first.

    Thirdly, when can we expect True Footage to add you to their superstar profile section, as I can’t wait to read your Bio?

    Can you please provide us with an appraisal fee sheet for work performed at your new company (True Footage)? What is the AMC split, and or will everything be sent out for a quote?

    Also, with your company pushing bifurcated / hybrid appraisals, considering its most likely soccer moms (no offense) will be completing the inspections / sketch’s (no ANSI training) is it true your company is considering a name change to, Not So True Footage?

    Lastly, I understand your a W2 employee now, but do you think you can bet back to us on one of your state mandated 15 minute brakes today?

    Seek the truth.

    Cons

  2. Didn’t you sell your business to become an employee. The business that was bringing in over a million dollars in annual appraisal revenue while you worked 20 hours a week?

    1. Why yes he did.

      From pitchbook.com

      True Footage General Information
      Description
      Developer of a real estate data authentication platform built to streamline residential transactions. The company uses video, computer vision, and machine learning to offer products such as square footage certification, floorplan, and property data capture, enabling lenders to save time and standardize data.

      Words like, streamline residential transactions, machine learning, save time, etc., are code for we are now going to take half of the half you were already getting for doing low level AMC work. Strangely, no mention of the word appraiser.

      Subject to repairs & alteration performed by Paul Herrington. Look a shiny penny!

      Seek the truth.

  3. Bill –

    There are 13 lines in your post and at least 8 grammar or spelling mistakes. If your appraisals are written that poorly, I would drop you from my approved list.

    Seek the proofreader.

    1. Step over that $100 to pick up a penny if you want Paul, but the truth is Dustin hasn’t been a full-time appraiser since 2010 (read his bio), and today is an AMC W2 employee. Keep ignoring that Dustin is a failed appraiser, and keep drinking Dustin’s Kool-Aid at your own peril Paul.

      Just a hunch, but something tells me your real name is Dave.

      Seek the truth, and pinch your nose to help avoid the bad taste of Dustin’s snake oil.

  4. I was working on my training manual just today. It is easy for the manual to get dated, so it’s important that as soon as a procedure changes, the manual gets updated.

  5. Bill – why would I lie about my name? I have nothing to hide and I am a certified appraiser so anyone who wants to look me up can find me if they want to. I don’t really care if Dustin is a full-time appraiser or that he sold his business. My comments were solely aimed at you – why drag your feelings about Dustin into the discussion?

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